Which Shops And Businesses Can Open And Which Must Remain Closed?

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Which shops and businesses can open? As the government eases the restrictions on the lockdown in phases it can lead to confusion.

We go through the different sectors. This includes which businesses can open and which must remain closed.

We also provide information on the new working safely guidance issued by the government. This guidance ensures that employees and customers are safe. It is a requirement for all businesses which are open.

The information below is correct as at 23rd June 2020. We will update this blog if and when new businesses can open.

Which shops and businesses can open now?


The following shops and businesses can open now. The businesses can open only if they are able to abide by strict guidelines including social distancing. Further information on these rules are stated later.

Supermarkets and other food retailers

Retail stores

Convenience stores, newsagents and corner shops

Off licences and licensed shops selling alcohol

Food delivery and takeaways

Medical providers including opticians, dentists, chiropractors, pharmacies and chemists

Banks and building societies

Post offices

Homeware, hardware and building suppliers

Garden centres and plant nurseries

Petrol Stations

Car repair and MOT services

Car showrooms

Bicycle shops

Taxi businesses

Laundrettes and dry cleaners

Which shops and business can open on 4th July 2020?


It was confirmed on 23rd June 2020 that the following businesses can open in just under 2 weeks time:

Hotels, hostels, B&B, caravan sites and other holiday homes

Restaurants and cafes

Bars and pubs

Hair salons and barbers

Cinemas and bingo halls

Museums and galleries

Outdoor gyms and playgrounds

Funfairs, theme parks, adventure parks and amusement arcades

Places of worship

Which shops and businesses must remain closed?


The following businesses must currently remain closed. There is currently no set date when these businesses will be able to reopen.

Nightclubs

Casinos

Nail bars, beauty salons, spas and tattoo studios

Indoor gyms and leisure centres, swimming pools and water parks

Bowling alleys and skating rinks

There are exemptions to the above lists. For further information please refer to the businesses and venues guidance.

What rules should businesses follow before opening?


The government have provided guidelines for businesses to follow. The guidelines allow businesses to open successfully and be compliant.

The rules have been broken down into the following areas:

Construction
Factories and warehouses
Research facilities
Offices
Other peoples homes
Restaurants offering takeaway services
Shops
Vehicles

For further information see the working safely during coronavirus guidance.

What can my business do now?


The world has changed and your business will now need to change too. Even the businesses that can open now, look very different to what they did pre-coronavirus.

Think of supermarkets and the changes that they have had to make. Restricting numbers, one way systems, floor signs, screens at the till, cleaning surfaces such as trolleys, face masks for employees, plus much more.

They have all been implemented to enable employees and customers to feel safe. If your business must remain closed you should consider the similar steps that you could make.

Follow the guidelines provided in the working safely during coronavirus instructions. Then when your business can reopen you will be ready to safely accept employees and customers once again.

Further Information on Business Openings

The guidance relating to which businesses can open and the rules ensuring that employees and customers are safe are being updated regularly. As a result you should consult the government guidance or discuss your circumstances with your accountant or advisor.

At Patterson Hall Chartered Accountants we will endeavour to keep our clients informed of these rule changes as they happen.

DISCLAIMER – Please note that the content contained in this article is for general information only and is not a substitute for professional advice – read our full disclaimer

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